Add Tension to Your Scenes

Stop reading this blog if you…

Don’t want to hear about how to revise my writer’s kryptonite – tension in scenes and how my novel needed MORE fun and games.

Keep reading if you want to learn how to add tension and the magic of F & G.

Welcome, comrades –

First, let’s answer a couple questions. 1) What is tension? And 2) What is Fun and Games.

I’ll tell you.

Tension, above all else, is what makes the reader cringe – aka bite their nails off as they read – about your character when they do…well, whatever it is you’re having them do. Fun and Games, I understand thanks to the magnificent screenwriter Blake Snyder (thank God his book landed in my hands), are those “trailer moments” – the moments a person comes to a movie, or buys a book.

TWO sugar in the cake elements in writing that I thought I was good at, but (longer than I’d like to admit) learnt I lacked when reading draft number one. But I’m not writing this blog about my writing skills. This blog is for you – just in case you’ve read your first draft and thought – dang it, I need more tension in my scenes and fun and games in my outline. And because this is a blog and blogs are for discussion – and hopefully you’ll comment at the end and help me learn from you, too!

OK, so here we go.

Just because everyone has already stripped Star Wars to the bone…and no wonder (it’s fun – F & G!)…let’s try a different story with the same genre.

Movie: The Lion King; Genre: Golden Fleece

Lion_King_Topiary_(14256214775)

Sweet. I Already Love This Movie. Lion Cub and a Baboon in a kingly entrance.

All right, let’s ignore the play-by-play and immediately target those scenes that stand out in tension INSIDE the F & G.

The F & G ones that come to mind are:

1.) Looking Over Pride Rock

3.) I Can’t Wait to Be King

2.) Elephant Graveyard

3.) Stampede

4.) Hakuna Matata

5.) Can You Feel the Love Tonight

6.) Rafiki Finds Simba/Remember Who You Are

7.) Timon and Pumba distract the hyenas

8.) Simba v. Scar

9.) Remember Who You Are (reprise)

But wait…you’re probably thinking, if you’ve read Blake Snyder’s book on screenwriting, Fun and Games only happens in the first beat in the beginning of Act Two. So did I. And then I realized, wait a second, that beat in the story might be called Fun and Games – but Fun and Games is needed throughout the entire film/novel. If they truly are the moments “readers/viewers” come to the movie/read the book – they should be everywhere! The difference between good F & G and – as I like to say – too convenient/incongruent F & G – is how they fit together to mold the character arc – i.e. your hero’s transformation.

SO, to answer your question, yes, F & G does happen in Act 2…but also in Act 1…and Act 3. Let’s look at these moments again and identify why they qualify as F & G.

F & G Major Moments in Lion King

1.) Looking Over Pride Rock

  • it’s a cool and what a breath-taking sunrise!
  • it’s bonding time with Dad – and Mufasa radiates coolness – not only because Simba thinks he is (so inevitably we do, too) but he’s KING OF THE PRIDELANDS- a pretty bad-ass, strong, confident, respected lion, so there’s that

3.) I Can’t Wait to Be King

  • a band of safari animals taking advantage of an annoying bird – hilarious F & G!
  • reinforcement of Theme Stated – Simba’s calling to be king – through song!

2.) Elephant Graveyard

  • it’s a graveyard of elephant bones filled with dangerous hyenas, which means chase scene!
  • TENSION!!!!!

3.) Stampede

  • another chase scene – with cool Mufasa to the rescue
  • TENSION!!!!!

4.) Hakuna Matata

  • an unlikely group of friends eating bugs and other “who cares” actions that we all admit sounds fun – despite being disgusting
  • Hi, I’m in a tropical getaway that appears outside a life-sucking desert

5.) Can You Feel the Love Tonight

  • Romance!
  • Nala returns – and it’s magical!

6.) Rafiki Finds Simba/Remember Who You Are

  • Well, a blue-butt baboon with a sweet walking stick is toying with our distressed hero – yup, that’s funny
  • Umm – helllllllo – Mufasa in giant spirit cloud form gives Simba a reality check – magic!

7.) Timon and Pumba distract the hyenas

  • straight up “enemy-disguise” comedy

8.) Simba v. Scar

  • The moment we’ve all been waiting for

9.) Remember Who You Are (reprise)

  • Simba is victorious!
  • Reinforcement of Theme Stated

All these sound like reasons to read a book (if it was a book) or watch the movie – yes? And I’m sure if you’re a Lion King fan, these scenes immediately triggered pictures in your memory with no effort whatsoever. How do they do that!? Well…

  1. They reinforce Theme Stated – The Circle of Life
  2. They add tension that creates Character Arc…the reason for this blog. 

So TENSION – how do you create it in scenes? Simpler than you’d think, actually, if you can remember three major points that need to happen in EVERY – I repeat – EVERY scene of your story. In this order, your hero MUST have

1.) A Goal

2.) A Conflict (that gets in the way of that goal)

and they must make

3.) A Decision (the hero is called to act!)

If your scenes don’t have this – and especially in your F & G – I’m putting your book down, no matter how hard I’ve tried to read it.

Let’s look at one of these moments from Lion King to see how they could have worked and why they actually  work.

Scene: Stampede

  • chase scene that causes cool Mufasa to the rescue the hero
  • Obvious Tension: Yes, it’s a chase scene, so of course we’re nervous because it triggers some key primal goals – survival! protection of loved ones! fear of death!
  • The Less Obvious – and probably more important tensionSimba thinks the stampede is his fault

Why is Simba’s misconception what creates the real tension in this scene, or, arguably, the more important tension? Because it sets-up Simba’s need for a transformation – his character arc! – and it pulls us back to the theme stated.

How? Let’s look at how to create tension and break the scene down…

  • Goal: Simba wants to practice his roar so he can be an impressive king
  • Conflict: Simba thinks he causes a stampede, which results in Mufasa’s death as the king saves him – aka – Simba killed Mufasa (a secret! a lie!)
  • Decision: Simba abandons the Pridelands out of shame and fear – with the intent of “never” coming back (The YouTube video does not play all the way to this moment, but I’d like to consider it the real end of the scene, so stay with me in this next part)

Hot damn, that’s a pretty good scene.

I’d like to point that this scene (not shown in entirety in the video) doesn’t end until Simba makes his point of no return decision – to “leave” his ordinary world. This decision is what really ends the scene – and a lot happens in it. Simba thinkhe causes the stampede. He runs. He almost dies when the tree he climbed up breaks. Mufasa climbs a giant cliff. Mufasa dies because Scar betrays him. Simba curls up under Mufasa’s giant paw telling him to wake up (tear-jerker). Scar manipulates Simba. Simba runs away.

Tension. Tension. Tension. Because of misconceptions. Because of secrets (this one, from Scar – who knows who really killed Mufasa but keeps this from Simba, foreshadowing a confrontation at the end of the story), and trailer-moment actions.

And all because of a heated moment of hot, effing F & G!

But do your scenes do this? ALL OF THEM? I know mine didn’t. And it wasn’t until I realized I needed this Goal-Conflict-Deicsion tension in ALL my scenes – and the multiple moments of F & G – that I discovered my weakness. So it was time to admit it, and turn those writing weaknesses into writing strengths.

I mean, can you imagine if Simba didn’t think he caused the stampede? No movie. NOO! What a less-fortunate story-world we storytellers would have.

And NOW, I encourage you now to do two EASY (one, anyway) things:emerson

1.) COMMENT on how you think tension and F & G applies to the other Lion King scenes suggested in this blog!!! I’d love to hear from you, and continue the discussion!

2.) Revise the tension and F & G in your novel – and comment again to let me know how it went!

Until then, waiting for you here on the web.

AKLambert, out.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s